“We’ve got orders.” Those three words have two reactions; instant excitement for a new journey, or a wave of anxiety that starts a mental “to-do list.” Either way, this phrase is bound to arise once, twice, eight times in your life as a MilSpouse; and after the first few pack outs, unpacking and rearranging, it becomes easier to accept a new zip code as home. If only the employment path for a MilSpouse could be as organized and orchestrated as a move with a  good moving company. As a former Career Counselor in Hampton Roads Virginia working with Veterans, exiting Military members and Military Spouses; and being a MilSpouse myself, I know firsthand the interruption a PCS can bring to a career. Whether you are just beginning your career after graduating college, or you are returning to the workforce after raising your children, navigating the ever changing and not always accepting world of workforce can be daunting. It is my hope that in the next five posts I am able to offer some tips of the trade and suggestions to make the process of looking for and returning to work less stressful and overwhelming.

Along with my co-workers, we developed these top six recommendations for MilSpouses who are seeking employment. I will address each of these steps in the next five posts. These tips work for all stages of your career path.

  1. Brainstorm Your Work History and Skills
  2. Develop a Working Resume
  3. Visit Your Local Workforce Development Agency/Employment Commission
  4. Create a LinkedIn Profile
  5. Join a Military Spouse Employment Group
  6. Be Flexible

Brainstorming Your Work History and Skills

 

Some of you may say, well wait a second, I haven’t worked in ___ months/years/ever. Or, I have been out of the workforce for over ___ months/years, or even; my degree/certification doesn’t match what I really want to do now, I think I covered them all, if not, not to worry, you can still create a killer resume.  Grab a sheet of paper, a cup of coffee and about 30 minutes of free time and a quiet place to think. Ask yourself these questions, what do you do at home to keep things running smoothly on a day to day basis? What about while your spouse is deployed, TDY, underway, or on duty? Do you volunteer for the command, at an outside public or private entity? If you don’t have a long work history, but plenty of volunteer experience, you have work experience! Paying bills, making sure everyone is where they are supposed to be and on time, working a soup kitchen or bake sale? Translate those skills to: bookkeeping and financial management, time management and organizational skills; good communication and written skills, fundraising. See where we are going here? Just because you may not have had a solid 8-5, you still have skills that are utilized in the workforce; you just have to know how to word them. If you have been volunteering on a consistent basis, while financially uncompensated, that still falls under employment, and can be used to show work history, and skills.  If you have work experience, list the employer and duties in chronological order going back 10 years. This process can take a couple of days or even weeks, don’t feel overwhelmed. Your resume is your “face” to the employer until you land the interview; you want to show your best. In the next post we will look at determining which style resume is best suited for you and how to create it.

Until next time;

Empowered Women, empower Women

 

**** Welcome**** to our newest blog teammate Keadra Young-Bogardus!

Keadra is a USN wife by way of Kalamazoo, Michigan who is currently stationed in Northeast Ohio with her husband who is a recruiter. Her background is in Law Enforcement; however, degrees in Sociology and Public Administration brought her to the world of Workforce Development. Keadra’s hobbies include fostering her budding business Kubed, LLC a training and consulting agency, and raising their daughter.